09 May, 2012

Creating vintage texture

Remember my SRPING TAG?  I really like its vintage-y textured background.  Not only it looks nice but it is also quite fun to make, so here is a step-by-step tutorial for adding vintage texture to art journals, ACTs, tags, and scrapbook pages


1. Begin by gathering tools and supplies: 
  • your tag (page, atc) 
  • acrylic paint (I've used white)
  • gesso (optional but helps to seal all the layers)
  • modeling paste for extra texture
  • mod podge
  • crackle paint (I've used in on the SPRING TAG but not on this one).  
You will also need pieces of paper, cheese cloth, lace, or even pieces of cloth for interesting vintage layered effects.  Prepare a couple of brushes.  I like using coarse, "cheap" brushes  - they leave interesting marks on the background.
2. Base coat
Cover your tag with a layer of gesso, dry, and apply a layer of acrylic paint.  Don't worry about being thorough or getting a uniform finish - this is simply a base coat.

3. Time to add texture
Glue pieces of paper onto your tag.  Cover the whole tag with a layer of acrylic paint.

4. Let's make it even more elaborate
Using modeling paste adhere cheese cloth.  Modeling paste is quite thick making it easy to create ridges and designs.  Use a piece of cardboard rather than a brush, when working with the paste.
Once the paste is fully dried (it might take a bit of time) glue more papers, lace, or cloth using mod podge.
5. Continue building up layers, painting over each of them.
Here I've added lace, painted the whole tag white, glued more paper, and painted once again.

6. A close up look at the texture.  Now it's time to add crackling paint (optional).

7. Once all the layers are glued, cover your work with a final layer of paint (or gesso) and enjoy the vintage texture.
I would love to see how you use vintage texture in your paper projects - send me an email or leave a comment!
xxx
Anya

 

5 comments:

  1. Great tutorial. Thanks for sharing. Karen.x

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    Replies
    1. Glad you like it, Karen. It's one of my favourite techniques and I absolutely love the final textured look.

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  2. what a nice work!! Thanks for sharing, Reading about you I thought this "what a lovely person!".
    Sorry for my english ..
    Love from Greece

    Agapi

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    Replies
    1. What a sweet comment to read in the morning, Agapi! Thank you so much!!!

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  3. If we focus more strictly on the scope of virtual reality as a means of creating the illusion that we are present somewhere we are not, then the earliest attempt at virtual reality is surely the 360-degree murals (or panoramic paintings) from the nineteenth century. These paintings were intended to fill the viewer’s entire field of vision, making them feel present at some historical event or scene.

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    ReplyDelete